Deep Run Baptist Church
10907 Three Chopt Road
Richmond, VA 23233
(804) 270-3831

Introduction
Part I—An Episcopal Chapel
Part II—A Baptist Church in the 18th Century
Part III—Happenings in the 19th Century
Part IV—20th Century Problems and Progress

Update of History of Deep Run Church

Part V – Pressing On
Pastors
Clerks
Bibliography
Celebrating Our 200th Anniversary
Links to our other pages and resources
   

The History of Deep Run Baptist Church

1742-1984

INTRODUCTION

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"He who lives in the past is not worthy of tomorrow, but he who knows not the past is not ready for tomorrow."

  This quotation has served as a challenge to the committee who has endeavored, through research, to bring the past of Deep Run Church to the people of today.

  We, in 1967, are celebrating the 225th anniversary of the building of Deep Run Church and its 175th anniversary as a Baptist Church. Too often we take things for granted, never stopping to think what has gone before to make the present possible. This history is written in an effort to bring to our readers an account of the happenings of these 225 years. The many trials and hardship which this grand old church has encountered reminds us of the fact "the hammers wear out but the anvil remains." As we read of the struggles through which Deep Run has passed, may we be inspired to push forward to a brighter tomorrow.

  In preparing this history, every effort has been made to make it accurate. The loss of all church records prior to 1931 has made the gathering of facts a difficult but rewarding task. We have had to rely upon the Dover Association Minutes we were able to find in the Virginia Historical Library at the University of Richmond. In addition to this, we have used books from the library at the Union Theological Seminary and from personal libraries.

  To the members and friends who furnished bits of information and pictures we are most grateful.

  To the pastor, Rev. Philip L. Cumbia, who gave so freely of his time in collecting facts and assisting in compiling them, we are deeply grateful.

  This committee who has compiled the history is composed of Rev. Philip Cumbia, ex officio, Mrs. Stanley Lundberg, Mr. and Mrs. Clearance B. Beneath and Miss Said Bowls, Chairman.

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HISTORY OF DEEP RUN CHURCH

Part I—An Episcopal Chapel

  Deep Run as it stands on this hill above Deep Run Creek is rich in history. As we trace its history we will see not all has been smooth sailing. It had its beginning as an Episcopal (Anglican) Chapel. The first mention that we can find of Deep Run is recorded in The History of Henrico Parish, (Moore). At a Vestry held for Henrico Parish October 2, 1742, “On petition of Thomas Fenton and others, it is agreed and ordered that a chapel be built on the hill above Deep Run on land belonging to (illegible), to be 48 feet long and 24 feet wide; to be weather boarded with fetheredge plank and covered with shingles, nailed on-to have three pews, reading desk, pulpit and gallery, to be finished workmanlike in a strong plain manner.” And it is agreed that the Vestry do meet at Curl’s Church on the last Saturday in November next to treat with undertakers about building the said chapel.” At this same meeting 10,000 pounds of tobacco were appropriated toward the building of the chapel.

  From this description and picture of the early Richmond Church (St. John’s) it would seem the two were built on the same general plan, with 5 windows on each side, a door in the west end, a gallery at the west end, and a small belfry. It may seem strange that the side of our church faces the road rather than the front. However, this may be explained by the fact that it was the practice of the early Episcopal Church to position their buildings east and west.

  Quoting again from Vestry minutes “November 19, 1744, William Street was paid 1,789 pounds of tobacco for Reading at Deep Run. John Coles and Peter Randolph were appointed to agree with the cheapest workmen they can to finish the chapel to be built at Deep Run.”

  The chapel was built on an acre of land purchased from John Shoemaker. At a meeting of the Vestry, December 2, 1745, John Shoemaker was paid 536 pounds of tobacco for cleaning the arbor and for an acre of land to set the chapel on. “In 1750, the church wardens were ordered to pay John Shoemaker when he acknowledged the deed for the acre of ground on which Deep Run Church stands.” For some reason Mr. Shoemaker was reluctant to sign the deed. By deed dated October 1, 1753 and recorded in Henrico County Deed Book 1750-57, Bowler Cocke, Jr. and Samuel DuVal, church wardens, bought the land on which the chapel was standing from John Shoemaker. Hence the church was built before the deed was signed.

  Builders tell us the beams in the sanctuary are put together with wooden pegs. From this and the condition of the timbers, the speculate, without doubt, that it represents the original frame work. If these timbers could speak, what a wealth of history they could reveal.

  John Shoemaker was sexton at Deep Run for a good many years. In the Vestry minutes 1745-46-47 and 48 we find “ John Shoemaker was paid 536 pounds of tobacco for cleaning the arbor.” In 1749, he was paid for cleaning the chapel. This indicates worship services were held here before the building was completed.

  During this time William Stith was the minister of the Parish. His salary was 16,640 pounds of tobacco. However, Deep Run had readers (Readors). William Street is most often mentioned at Deep Run. His salary was 1,789 pounds of tobacco.

  On October 4, 1762, a silver cup and salver were ordered for Deep Run. These were to be the size of those at Richmond Church (St. John’s). There is no record in Vestry minutes that these were paid for or delivered, but it is to be presumed they were.

  During the years of 1764-1773, William Street is mentioned in the Vestry Minutes as clerk of Deep Run. His salary was 1,789 pounds of tobacco. Other sextons during this period were John Ellis, Joseph Ellis and Joseph Freeman. Each received 536 pounds of tobacco.

  In 1773, Rev. Miles Seldon was rector of the Parish. At this time the Revolutionary War clouds were gathering. The record is broken and we have only glimpses until 1785. There is one glimpse that is of interest. In the Virginia Magisterial History, Volume 3, we read that “during the Revolutionary War, General Peter Muhlenberg, who was also a preacher, camped at Deep Run Church and there enrolled men among his forces.” It is also reported that Lafayette and his soldiers gathered in Deep Run to discuss plans during the Revolutionary War. Wounded soldiers were cared for in Deep Run Church building, used as a hospital during this time. We have no documentation on this, but accept it as true, having been passed down from generation to generation.

  At the first Vestry Meeting in March 1785, at the courthouse in the city of Richmond, Edmund Randolph and Bowler Cocke were appointed church wardens. They were instructed to repair the churches. It is evident one of these churches was Deep Run. (page 25 Moore: History of Henrico Parish). There was no minister. The Rev. John Buchanan was elected by the Vestry. He had come to Richmond from Amherst County. “His duty was to preach every other Sunday at Richmond Church and on the intervening Sunday at Curles and Deep Run alternately.”

  In 1790, a “ most delightful fraternity” existed between Rev. Buchanan and the Presbyterian minister, Rev. John Blair. They began to worship jointly. This prompted the Vestry, in that year, to extend permission to “any regular minister of any denomination professing Christianity, to use the country churches of the Parish, when they were not being used by the Episcopals.”

  In 1792, conditions of the Parish were very poor. The depressed condition of the whole Episcopal Church of Virginia was great. Only one Vestry meeting was held between April 1794 and May 1812. The annual conventions were not held for several years. During the time the Episcopal Church in Virginia was steadily on the decline.

  By this time the Baptists were gaining strength in Virginia. In 1788, the General Association had been formed and divided into four districts, The Lower District was named Dover.

  In 1789, the Baptist sent a petition to the House of Delegates, asking that all church land and property purchased by the people before the Revolutionary War be put to public use and that all churches be free for all people and preachers of every denomination (Original in Virginia State Library). In 1794 the Assembly repealed prior acts and the ownership of the glebes (homes of the ministers of the Episcopal Church) reverted to the state.

  Rev. McClaren Brydon: Highlights Along the Road of the Anglican Church, states: “By acts of the General Assembly 1799 and 1802, all property of the Episcopal Churches, secured before the Revolutionary War, was seized and sold by the state. This included glebe farms, church bells and communion vessels.” The Episcopal Church lay dormant in a state of collapse, which lasted for many years. The church buildings were left deserted.

  As promoters of this final act in removal of legal discrimination between religious denominations, the Baptists were subjected to long, continued attacks. (Dr. Garnett Ryland: Baptist of Virginia.) We could name a long list who were imprisoned for preaching

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Part II—A Baptist Church in the 18th Century

  The year 1789 seems to have been a time of great revival for the Baptists: 21 churches were reported to the Dover Association. By 1791 this number had grown to 27. In that year 1791, Hungry church was constituted from Chickahominy Church (now Winn’s in Hanover County). This church was located on the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad near the crossing that bears its name.

  Unfortunately no church minutes for the first 139 years of this church, which later became Deep Run Baptist, can be located. We much depend entirely upon Dover Association Minutes for the information we can collect. In a few instances we found information regarding some of the ministers in books by various authors. These books will be referred to.

  Peter Cottrell was their first pastor. There were 41 members. "He falling into disorder was expelled." The church was left destitute. Elders William Webber served churches in and around Richmond for more than 40 years. In Semples: History of Baptists in Virginia, we are told "Elder Webber, a young minister who went out from Goochland Church, was imprisoned in Chesterfield County, but continued to preach through the grated windows of the prison."

  In 1798 Bernard Reynolds, once a Methodist, settled among them and became their pastor. He, a civic-minded man serving in civic as well as religious affairs, was appointed magistrate for the county.

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Part III—Happenings in the 19th Century

  The Church by the name of Hungry disappeared from the Dover Association in 1817, but he same minister and messengers appear in the 1818 minutes as representing Deep Run.

  During the period of decline in the Episcopal Church it appears, with permission granted other denominations to use its churches, the Deep Run building gradually came into possession of the Baptists. Just how this came about we were not able to ascertain. Why the members moved from Hungry to Deep Run we are not able to determine, but in the minutes of the Dover Association held in Richmond, Virginia, October 9th, 10th, and 11th, 1819, it is recorded: "The name of the church formerly called Hungry is now known by the name Deep Run." From there on Deep Run has appeared regularly in the Dover Minutes. Bernard Reynolds remained the pastor until 1822. At that time Eli Ball came from New England to serve as pastor and remained until 1834.

  Mr. Ball was a very energetic, wide-awake minister, interested in all activities that were for the betterment of mankind. He is recognized preaching "courtly in manner, varied in scholarship and with recognized preaching ability." It was under his direction that Sunday Schools were organized in the Dover Association.

  In 1827, the first annual meeting of the "Virginia Society for the Promotion of Temperance" met at Deep Run. Mr. Ball had already organized an auxiliary society here.

  On June 8th, 1830, " The Virginia Baptist Educational Society" was formed: 14 young men were received; 9 of these were placed with Elder Baptist in Powhatan County, and 5 were placed with Mr. Ball in Henrico County. This led to the establishment of Richmond College in 1832.

  In Cook: Story of Baptists of all Ages and Countries, we find the Religious Herald was established in Richmond, Virginia in 1825. One of its projectors and editors was Mr. Ball.

  During Mr. Ball’s ministry, the Dover Association Minutes of 1834 record: Female Missionary Society, Colonization and Track Societies, 3 Sunday Schools, a Bible class and regular prayer meetings at Deep Run. The Dover Minutes of 1833 state there were two Sunday Schools. L. Howard Jenkins: History of Sunday School of the Dover Association states a Sunday School was at Deep Run in 1832. Mr. Ball was appointed to prepare a letter on the subject of promoting Sunday Schools.

  When Mr. Ball began his ministry, the membership was 311; 37 members were excluded and several had died. When he left in 1834 there were 265 members. The contributions amounted to $200.00.

  Meriwether L. Jones was pastor from 1835 through 1839. It is recorded in the Dover Minutes, "the church enjoyed peace and unanimity, regular prayer meetings are held, all benevolent plans of the day are favored. The church has a Female Missionary Society, a Temperance Society, Colonization Society, Bible Class and Sunday School." In 1836, the minutes state "they have furnished their pastor, to aid in the support of his family, the sum of $80.00. They have contributed to the cause of domestic missions, and for the circulation of the Bible in Burmah. They have a Foreign Mission and a Temperance Society. Prayer meetings are held in the various neighborhoods." This would indicate the church was serving a wide area.

  In 1837, the Sunday School reported 74 scholars. Brother Richard Dabney was superintendent. They recorded nothing of importance occurring during this year. The contribution was $3.00. Membership was 299.

  In 1839, the records show that the Sunday School had been suspended a Deep Run. No reason for this action was given.

  Mr. Reuben Ford, a native of Goochland County, born 1816, became pastor in 1841. He served four churches: Deep Run, Goochland, Dover and Winn’s. In 1844 under Mr. Ford there were 592 members. This is the largest membership recorded. Of this number 258 White and 334 were Negro. Mr. Ford was at Deep Run until 1845.

  Mr. Ford was an advocate of equal religious rights and a leader in securing the separation of church and state in Virginia.

  A marker to the memory of Mr. Ford stands on Route 250 at the intersection with 612 at New Shallow Well. A mile north of this marker is the home and grave of Mr. Ford. A tablet is also at Goochland Church where he was pastor for 52 years.

  In 1846, Rev. Joseph Hay became the pastor. He had been ordained November 15, the previous year at Deep Run Church, while Mr. Ford was pastor. It was in this year, 1846, that some of the members left Deep Run to form a new church. This church was named Berea. Mr. Hay and Mr. Rock preached the charge to the new church and Mr. Hay became its first pastor. This tells us that Berea Church, Hylas, Virginia is a daughter of Deep Run. Mr. Hay served Deep Run until 1847.

  Messengers mentioned during these early years, include Richard Dabney, R. M. Courtney, R. Smoot, J. W. Cottrell, John Snead, Henry Satterwhite, W. G. Thomasson, E. DuVal, T. Gordon, Miles DuVal, J. F. Franklin, T. Taurman and John Ford. Many of these names represent plantation owners of that time.

  Mr. John Rock took over the pastorate in 1847. We find the membership had decreased to 536, there being a decrease in both White and Negro members. This was no doubt partially due to the fact that Berea had been organized. When we recall the mode of transportation at that time it is astounding think people traveled so far to church, Berea being 8 miles away. Mr. Rock was pastor for 2 years. We have no record of what was accomplished during this time. The membership reported was 498.

  In 1849 W. G. Thomasson was pastor. Richard DuVal and Richard Dabney were delegates. The membership was 543. The Dover Minutes report "we have been revived in our hearts by the out-pouring of God’s Holy Spirit, and many precious souls have been converted to God. Two prayer meetings are held in the bounds of the church. A Sabbath School is in successful operation."

  Both White and Negro members increased during this time; seven were dismissed by letter and four were excluded; no reason given. Mr. Dabney, the delegate, lived on the Snead plantation on Pump Road.

  Rev. G. G. Exall, who lived at Cheswick, Henrico County, was pastor from 1850 to 1857. During this time we find Deep Run was holding Sunday School at the Ridge Meeting House. The following quotation is taken from the Religious Herald of December 1, 1853 and was sent in by Mr. Exall on November 22 of that year from Cheswick. "About the time I moved to my present residence, some of the Deep Run brethren erected within half mile of my house, a slab shed, with 2 sides coarsely boarded, and with seats to correspond. Here they met on the Lord’s day afternoon to worship God. For sometime but few attended except the giddy young persons. But the day of small things was not despised. They held on their way and grew stronger and stronger. Before long, however, horses and carts, with other vehicles, were seen at the seats and the attendance was increased. But this booth did not afford shelter from the storms and cold of winter, and the brethren erected near by at the intersection of the Ridge Road with Three Chopped Road, the Ridge meeting house, a plain framed building 30 x 42 feet (this is however, no yet paid for). Here a Sabbath School is conducted in summer, and will be continued in winter when the house is plastered. I have preached at the Ridge for two years past on the 1st Lord’s day in each month to people very much needing instruction and I am pleased to say that I do not preach elsewhere to a more respected or promising audience." (Was Ridge a daughter of Deep Run?)

  The membership reported as 392 indicated a decline. Miles DuVal, and J. F. Franklin were delegates in 1852. (The Franklin name is a link with Ridge.)

  In 1858 H. D. Nuckols became the pastor. Mr. Nuckols served the church until 1866. The Sunday School record found in the Historical Library stated that Sunday School was adjourned in 1861 because there were so few scholars. This was signed by William DuVal, secretary. No doubt this was due to the War Between the States. In 1866 we find minutes that the Sunday School was reorganized.

  In 1867 Mr. Henry Satterwhite, who had left Deep Run, to become one of the charter members of Berea, came back as pastor. He had been ordained during the war. He served Deep Run, Winn’s and North Run.

  The only time Dover Association met at Deep Run was in 1871 while Mr. Satterwhite was pastor. There seems to have been not only a decline in membership during those years but a laxity in attendance. We found in Dover Minutes of 1873 the following query from Deep Run, "Brethren, we desire your advice as to what is best to be done with members who will not attend church or contribute toward its support, but whose conduct in other respects we do not know to be inconsistent?" The answer given was, "Instruct them in their duty; urge them to discharge it. If they fail, exclude them." Could not this same query be asked today? Who has the answer?

  In 1868 there were 53 erasures. We do not know why they were erased. These may be been Negroes who left to unite with a Negro church. The following is taken from the historical records of the Quioccasin Baptist church. "History shows that the Deep Run Baptist Church was listing its membership as consisting of 257 Negroes and 244 Whites. In 1865 Rev. Royal Smith, and a band of these Negroes, pulled out from the Deep Run Baptist Church. In 1867 this band of people really organized and recognized as the Quioccasin Baptist Church."

  Mr. Satterwhite stayed at Deep Run until 1877. Benjamin Franklin Bowles, postmaster at Erin Shades, the post office for Deep Run and community for many years, was church clerk.

  The messenger from Deep Run to the Dover Association in 1877 was Taylor P. Jones. His home on Church Road is now owned by Frank Bliley. Mr. Jones is buried on the old DuVal estate, which has been developed. The grave site may be found on property owned by Charles Barnett.

  In 1876, Deep Run lost 27 members by letter. This is the first year Mt. Vernon is mentioned in the Dover Minutes. Interestingly they report receiving 27 members by letter. Mr. Satterwhite was listed as their pastor. This may indicate the 27 left to unite with Mr. Vernon.

  Elder Satterwhite died November 12, 1877. A note in the Dover Minutes pays a nice tribute to him. He was married twice—first to Miss Henley and then to Miss Eliza H. Laughton. The Satterwhites in Berea Church are his descendants.

  In 1878, Edmund Harrison came to Deep Run. The total membership is listed as 69. The Sunday School reported being in session 12 months with an enrollment of 70. Mr. John T. DuVal was the superintendent. In 1879 no pastor or delegates were reported. B. F. Bowles was clerk and T. P. Jones was Sunday School Superintendent. The year 1880 shows no report. We can only assume Mr. Harrison was pastor for those two years.

  In 1881 Arthur E. Cox was pastor. B. F. Bowles was clerk and J. T. DuVal was Sunday School superintendent. The Church membership was 61. The Sunday School reported 53 pupils and a library of 150 volumes. There is no report for 1882.

  In 1883, James W. Reynolds was pastor and Robert Scott was clerk. This year there were 21 additions to the church. The total membership was listed as 91 males. No female members were reported. We feel sure this was an error. Mr. Reynolds stayed as pastor for 2 years. The church showed a decrease in membership during this time.

  George Braxton Taylor in his book Virginia Baptist Ministers, tells the following story of J. W. Reynolds’ conversions. "For two summers he was convicted of sin, went to all the meetings but at the close he felt ‘the summer is ended and I am not saved’." The third summer his father was preaching at Mt. Zion Church and had the family horse with him, James arose at dawn and went to a neighbor to borrow a horse to ride to the meeting. He wore a new straw hat. When the invitation was given, he half arose to go forward but something said to him "If you go up yonder, someone will sit on your hat." He didn’t go. That afternoon he accepted the first invitation, and sixteen others followed him. He was a leader of men thereafter.

  Mr. Reynolds was a pastor-evangelist and a great visitor in spite of poor means of transportation. The theme of his last sermon was "The Judgment." He came home from church, ate dinner as usual and retired to his room for rest. At three o’clock he came from his room and said, "I’m dreadfully sick." He passed away two weeks later.

  Mr. J. B. Cook was the next pastor. No records are available to tell of the work done during his stay. We did find that he was ordained at Ridge Church. The date of his ordination is not given. The membership showed slight increase.

  Robert Scott was church clerk, and John T. DuVal was Sunday School superintendent. The School was in session twelve months. There were thirteen officers and teachers and 86 scholars. Papers taken were reported as 75. Mr. Cook may have been pastor in 1886, but this is blank in the Dover Minutes. Robert Scott was clerk. The membership showed an increase.

  In 1887 H. W. Jones was pastor and Robert Scott was clerk. Messengers included the pastor, the clerk, J. T. DuVal was Sunday School superintendent. The enrollment of the Sunday School had decreased sharply. Contributions are reported as $6.80. There was a library of 150 volumes.

  It is recorded in the Dover minutes of 1888 "Deep Run is rapidly pushing the work on its new building." This is the year the church was rebuilt. The present sanctuary is the rebuilt church.

  In 1889-1890, R. W. was the pastor and James L. Henley was clerk. The membership was 83. There was no report form the Sunday School. Some of our senior citizens recall hearing their parents talk about Professor Cridlin. (Was he a professor at Richmond College or was he a schoolteacher?) Interesting to note: Mr. Henley had a son born about this time who was named Cridlin. No doubt he was named after this gentleman.

  In 1891 Edmund Harrison came back to Deep Run. Mr. Harrison was a Latin professor at Richmond College, being "one of seven who carried that institution through the Civil War." How he struggled with classes all the week and preached Sunday after Sunday gives us a picture of the strenuous times and the strength and vigor of this professor-preacher. His only means of transportation was by horse and buggy. (This information was obtained from Virginia Baptist Ministers Sixth Series, page 41: Taylor). The church at this time had 88 members J. L. Henley was clerk and B.F. Bowles was Sunday School Superintendent. A note in the Dover Minutes of 1893 states "The impairment of Harrison’s health caused him to resign the charge of Deep Run." In 1893 Deep Run is mentioned as having a mission school.

  J. R. Wilkerson was pastor from 1894 through 1899 or 1900. This uncertain date is because Deep Run was not represented in 1900. In 1899 W. H. Walker was clerk. Robert Taylor and O. H. Powers were delegates. In the minutes of 1899 a Woman’s Missionary Society was reported at Deep Run. We can find no details of work done during this time.

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Part IV—20th Century Problems and Progress

  No record was found of 1900 other than the total membership, which was reported as 145, and W. H. Walker was the church clerk.

  In 1901-02, E. T. Poulson was pastor. His salary was $125.00 annually. W. J. Barr was the Sunday School superintendent. Delegates were J. J. Browning, W. H. Walker and Alley Sadler. The membership was 90. Alonzo Snead was Sunday School Superintendent.

  In 1904 the pastor was J. O. Kirk; clerk, W. H. Walker and 97 members were reported. Delegates were W. H. Walker, Willie Jones, Alley Sadler and W. J. Barr. Alonzo Snead was still Sunday School Superintendent.

  In 1905 L. W. Smith was pastor of Deep Run. He was Berea at the same time. The delegates were W. J. Barr, Willie Jones, J. L. Henley and Julian Browning. Alonzo Snead was superintendent. "Ladies’ Aid" records show they gave Mr. Smith $5.00 for a Christmas gift.

  L. W. Smith was still pastor in 1906 and he was also pastor at Ridge. Willie Jones was church clerk. J. A. Sadler was superintendent. The church showed an increase of 20 in membership. Delegates to the Association were L. W. Smith, W. S. Jones, W. J. Bar, J. A. Sadler and C. R. Ford. Many names appearing during the early 1900’s are familiar ones in our church today.

  In 1907 the pastor was Samuel L. Naff. W. S. Jones was clerk. J. A. Sadler was superintendent of the Sunday School. The delegates were Cridlin Henley, J. A. Sadler, Henry Scott and J. J. Browning. Mr. Naff drove a horse and buggy. He was interested in a schoolteacher in the neighborhood and frequently drove from his other charge in Centralia to call upon this fair lady, Miss Sallie Fitz. This romance came to naught. Mr. Naff left the church after a year’s service. The church reported in 1908 they were trying to secure another pastor. That year the Ladies’ Aid paid $7.80 on the pastor’s salary. The clerk was W. S. Jones. Superintendent was J. A. Sadler. Delegate was J. A. Sadler.

  In 1909 James A. Clark was pastor. He served Berea at he same time and lived in the home of Mrs. Robert Snead. Mr. Clark’s own story, remembered by some of our senior citizens, was "in his early years he led a very wild life." From the pulpit he stated, "at the age of 21 he could not have read his name if it had been printed in letters as large as the church." Mr. Clark was a fearless speaker and on occasion had encounters with some of the members because of his messages.

  Mrs. Clark helped with the music. At that time there was a pump organ that sat directly in front of the pulpit. She faithfully pumped away and played hymns for the congregation. There was no choir nor director but the congregation enjoyed singing gospel hymns. The hymnals used at that time had no notes.

  Mr. Clark stayed through 1910. Those active and mentioned were: W. S. Jones, clerk; J. A. Sadler, superintendent. The delegates to the Dover Association this year, besides the pastor, were W. J. Barr, J. A. Sadler and W. S. Jones. Why Mr. Clark left is not recorded.

  A. L. Shumate and his wife were at Deep Run next but stayed only a short time. He also was pastor at Winn’s. He left in the summer of 1911 to attend seminary. His sister was Margie Shumate, whose name is familiar to all W. M. U. workers.

  Mr. W. J. Yeaman came to the church to fill the vacancy. We find, from minutes of the Ladies’ Aid Society, that he was a member of this society in August 1911. W. S. Jones was still clerk. The superintendent was J. E. Kennedy. Delegates were H. W. Scott, C. R. Ford and the pastor. The letter to the Association in 1913 stated Mr. Yeaman had just resigned. C. A. Bowles was clerk; J. L. Henley was Sunday School Superintendent. The church membership was 108. Deep Run and Ridge shared their pastor, alternating worship services.

  W. F. Brannock came as pastor in 1914. The church again worked with Ridge. Mr. Brannock lived with the J. B. Badenoch family in the Ridge area. He was an energetic, wide-awake minister. The clerk was C. A. Bowles and the superintendent was J. L. Henley. Mr. Brannock left the church in 1915. The Ladies’ Aid Society paid $10.00 on his salary. The reason for leaving is not recorded.

  Robert Lord Bausum was pastor for part of 1915 and 1916. He was a student at Richmond College and served with both Deep Run and Ridge. Again services were alternated. In those days young people were not afraid to walk. When services were at Deep Run in the afternoon there was always a good representation from Ridge.

  Mr. Bausum did not stay long. He felt called to the mission field and after attending Crozer Theological Seminary at Chester, Pennsylvania, went to China as a missionary. After he reached China he sent back may pictures, among them one of opium being burned. We wish we knew something about his work in China.

  S. Roy Orrell was at Deep Run in 1916. He was a student at the University. The Ladies’ Aid Society minutes report a gift o $5.00 to Mr. Orrell in September of 1917. Mr. Orrell left to serve in the Navy. He married Ina Scott, a member of Deep Run.

  For a short time a Mr. Sheppard was with the church. He worked during the week at a brickyard. He is remembered as the preacher who wore the long tailcoat. This year the church had 127 members. C. A. Bowles was the clerk and J. H. Scott was the messenger to the Association. Mr. Bowles held his office until 1920. L. A. Snead was superintendent. Contributions amounting to $97.00 were reported. We have no record of the pastor’s salary.

  During the early part of the 20th century the annual picnic on the church grounds was a great event. A table approximately 30 feet long was built under the great oak trees that shaded the grounds. This table was built and fastened to the trees. It remained for years and years. The men gathered early on the appointed day and made a huge barrel of lemonade. Lemons were bought by the crate, sugar by the 100 pounds and ice by large 300-pound blocks. Everyone drank lemonade to his hearts content.

  The ladies vied to see who could bring the largest baskets of real home cooked food. It was hard to wait until it was time to eat. Every lady thought everyone should partake of her food. There was no thought of calorie counting. The Ladies’ Aid Society sold refreshments in the afternoon. This was usually homemade ice cream. Can you imagine hearing those freezers creaking as they were being turned by hand? There is a record in the Ladies’ Aid Society minute book of a report on a Sunday School picnic, which illustrates efforts to raise money.

 

    The report follows:
         2 gallons ice cream $   2.40
         S.S. picnic refreshments $ 25.90
         Total cost $ 28.30
         Paid out for ice cream & bananas $ 18.10
         Balance $ 10.20

 

  In 1919 R. E. Hayes came as pastor. Mr. Hayes was a widower with two small children. His station in life appeared to be an unhappy one. He stayed at Deep Run only one year. The report to the Association showed little progress. We find, however, the 75 million campaign for missions had been launched. The suggested apportionment for each church in the Dover association was $1000 to be paid is five years. This was the first organized campaign for missions.

  Sometime during this period 3.88 acres of land on the north side of Three Chopt Road was deeded to the church for cemetery property by Mr. John T. Jones. This ground is presently being plotted and plans are now being made for perpetual care endowment. On January 22, 1920, James Henley was buried in this cemetery. He was the first person buried there.

  In the early days of Deep Run many of the deceased members were buried around the church. The location of the graves has long since been lost, but we feel certain even a part of our Educational Building is resting over these graves.

 The next pastor was W.W. Townsend. He was an ordained minister who was working as principal of one of the Richmond Public Schools. His next door neighbor, Donald Cole, a friend of members of deep Run, was instrumental in getting Mr. Townsend to take over the pastorate of the church, from 1920 through 1923 or ’24. While Mr. Townsend was at Deep Run the first addition was added to the church. Before this time there was nothing but the auditorium. Under Mr. Townsend’s guidance the six classrooms at the rear of the sanctuary were built. Mr. Malcolm Snead, Mr. Lemuel Snead and Mr. Julian Browning did most of the work on this structure. We have no record of when it was dedicated. June 1920, the Ladies’ Aid society voted to give $25.00 to help pay for the new organ. This was another pump organ. 

  Noah B. Farris followed Mr. Townsend. He did not stay vary long and the exact date cannot be established. The closest we can come to the time is to say it was between 1924 and 1925. He was a student at the University of Richmond.

  C. J. Ashley is recorded in the Dover Minutes as pastor in 1926. He stayed only a short time. The exact time cannot be established. He had a family of several children.

  In 1927 Gordon L. Price, a young student from the University of Richmond, took over the pastorate. He was very popular with the young people. J. Herbert Eubank was church clerk. Mr. Price died in 1966. A very nice tribute was paid him in the Religious Herald.

  In 1929-31 R. Cole Lee, a student at the University, served as the pastor. At the same time he served North Run. Mr. Lee married Miss Evelyn Toombs, a member of North Run. He resigned in August 1931. During Mr. Lee’s term of service the financial condition of the church was at low ebb.

  W. Frank Cale, a young student from the University of Richmond, was called to finish the year 1931 and for 1932, at a salary of $500.00 per year. Services were held every Sunday morning. Mr. Cale was ordained while he was at Deep Run. At his request, this service was held at his home church in North Carolina.

  During this time kerosene lamps were replaced by a Delco Plant to generate electricity. Just when this was first used we are not certain.

  There was an active Baptist Young People’s Union. Mr. Johnny Ramkey was the director.

  The church was still being heated by a stove in the center of the church in June 1933 to further his education.

  During the summer of 1933, the church disposed of the janitor and allowed the ladies to clean the church, using the money saved to buy needed supplies. This is an indication of the financial condition at this time. The total amount paid to missions was $74.74.

  Arthur Rich, a very young man and student at the University, was called to the pastorate in July 1933. In the first revival Mr. Rich held, he was assisted by Rev. Harvey Bryant. Mr. Rich had not been ordained, but at he request of the church, he baptized the candidates.

  Mr. Rich was a great worker and visitor. According to the minutes recorded he reported he had eaten 21 meals. The amount of food he reported having consumed indicated Deep Run either had good cooks or Mr. Rich had the ability to consume unpalatable food.

  In November 1933, the flue was moved from the center of the church to the south side of the building at a cost of $42.53. This work was done by Mr. J. J. Browning. A committee of ladies was appointed to raise funds to defray this cost. Mrs. W. B. Lloyd was named chairman of this committee.

  December 1933, the committee planning the Christmas pageant requested permission to enlarge the platform temporarily. This led to a permanent enlargement and the rostrum we now have.

  In June 1936, Mr. Rich resigned. He left the church August 1936 to attend the seminary. Before he left, he conducted a very fine revival. Mr. Rich had made a name for himself. In June 1967, the degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by the University of Richmond. We are very proud of the boy who preached his first sermon in our pulpit.

  November 8th, 1936, Phillip Tomlinson was called to be pastor. He was also a student at the University. Mr. Tomlinson did not remain very long. On April 11, 1937, his resignation was read and accepted. Not much of importance is recorded during this time. One item of interest is that the Virginia Electric & Power Company was granted a right of way across the church property. The church began considering rewiring the church for electricity. Mr. Clyde Lockhart offered to do the work if the church would furnish the material. The offer was accepted and for this work he was given $10.00 and a rousing vote of thanks.

  Mr. Rich came back and supplied the pulpit during the summer months of that year. The driveway was graveled and the cement was poured at the front of the church. This was a great improvement. Mrs. Ann Jones, wife of John T. Jones, had left the church a sum of money, $1000.00. The trustees met with Mr. Pullens, clerk of Henrico "to request the circuit court of Henrico to allow said trustees to invest the thousand in the First Federal Saving and Loan Association of Sandston, Virginia and to use the $300.00 in the Southern bank & Trust Company, Grace Street Branch, to the credit of the court in the Chancery cause of Ada Irene Jones, Executor of John T. Jones, deceased vs. C. A. Bowles et als., Trustees for the purpose of said church." W. E. Browning, C. W. Henley and Henry Yancey were trustees. A copy of these minutes were certified by the clerk of the church and sent to the Judge of the circuit Court of Henrico County. These minutes are dated September 15, 1937.

  Rev. Carl Collins was the pastor who came next in October 1937. His wife was very active and useful to the church. The financial condition of the church was very poor. Minutes shows that the Baptist Training Union and the Sunday School had each assumed 1/3 of the expense for coal. The bill was $16.30. The Baptist Training Union had recently been reorganized. The minutes state it showed improvement under Mr. Collins. Virginia Electric had cut its right of way and "the wood was used for fuel at the church."

  The tablet to the memory of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. smith, Mr. and Mrs. John T. Jones and Mrs. Sibera Gordon Goodman which is in Brooks Auditorium was ordered by the church.

  The floor in the church was very old. The cracks between the boards and the holes cut to accommodate the tobacco chewers made the floor very cold. When it was proposed that a new floor be placed over the old one a great argument arose. Some of the older members thought it was not right to cover up these boards that had been trodden on by their fathers. Finally the church voted to put down a new floor. The completed job cost $175.00. During Mr. Collins’ ministry the Women’s Missionary Union was active, as was the Ladies’ Aid Society.

  The first recorded Daily Vacation Bible School was held in 1939 supported 50% by the church. Mr. Collins was principal. There is no record of the enrollment. The first Financial Secretary was principal. There is no record of the enrollment. The first Financial Secretary was appointed by Mr. Collins. Miss Elizabeth Browning was appointed to this office. Mr. Collins resigned in May 1939. He had had a very successful ministry. Dr. Collins will join the faculty of Wingate College in September 1967.

  Maynard Adams, a student at the University, became the next pastor. He served Deep Run and Ridge alternation morning and evening services. The two churches paid a salary of $1200.00. A "Relations Committee" was appointed to work with Ridge on matters in which both churches were involved.

  A Junior Board of Deacons was elected. John Lloyd, III, Wilson Lloyd, Otis Browning and Hunter Browning composed this board.

  Financial conditions were better. New pews were purchased, the interior was painted, 50 new hymn books were purchased and the janitor’s salary was increased from $9.00 to $12.00 per month. New carpet had been put in the sanctuary. The pews were dedicated April 7, 1940. This was a great improvement to the sanctuary.

  The Western Dover Rural Sunday School Convention was held at Deep Run, April 23, 1940. The special feature of this meeting was pictures and talks on Vacation Bible School. That spring a Vacation Bible was held with an enrollment of 95. The Sunday School enrollment was 123.

  Woodrow W. Herrin and his wife came to serve Deep Run and Ridge in 1941. These were days of gas and tire shortage and activities were, of necessity, held to a minimum. The church minutes state the Vacation Bible School was not conducted on this account.

  The old long picnic table was still under the spreading oak trees. The members of the House Committee were made responsible for its upkeep. All church meetings were held on the Sunday morning when there was no preaching service. All building fund money on hand was invested in War Bonds and the building campaign was discontinued for the duration of World War II.

  On September 23, 1942, a letter from Mr. Herrin was read, offering his resignation. He went to serve as Chaplain in the Armed Forces of our Country.

  Mr. and Mrs. Herrin had one child, Marwood, while serving at Deep Run. Later, a second son, "Billy" was born to this couple. The met an untimely death due to an automobile accident in 1962.

  The church was without a regular pastor until July 1943, when Harold White came as pastor. Heating the church was still a problem. The question of providing a parsonage was brought up for the first time.

  A Service Flag was placed in the church in honor of our boys who were serving our Country. We are indeed grateful they all were able to return.

  Mr. and Mrs. Ira S. Harrell came to Deep Run and Ridge in 1945 and remained until September 1946. They had one daughter. At that time building a parsonage jointly with Ridge was considered but this did not materialize. Instead, a house belonging to Mr. F. G. Pruitt was rented as a parsonage. Mrs. Harrell passed away while they were at Deep Run.

  Miss Stanley Browning became Sexton of the church in 1945 and is still performing this service at the present time. [1967] We are grateful for her faithfulness and the good condition in which she has kept our church for these many years.

  J. Vernon Brooks came to Deep Run as supply pastor in March of 1947 at a salary of $75.00 a month. He was a student living at the Diesel Housing Unit with his wife and one child, Bonnie. Mr. Brooks never turned aside from any task. Where there was work to do at the church or for any neighbors he was always there to do his part. He led men to Christ by the way he lived as well as by his messages from the pulpit. He was the first full time pastor the church had. Under his guidance the Baptist Training Union was reorganized, a unified budget was begun and contributions to a foreign student to attend Glen Allen High School was made. A direction sign was placed at Broad Street and Cox Roads.

  At a business meeting May 4, 1951, Mrs. Katie Ramkey requested that something be done to furnish water for her Sunday School class. The house committee, headed by Hunter Browning, was assigned the task without compensation . The well was completed and an electric pump was installed by Herbert Eubank.

  A lighted ball field had been opened at Short Pump School and a church league had been formed. We had three teams from the church to participate in this league. The trophies they won are on display in Brooks Auditorium.

  On October 10, 1951, Mr. Brooks reported to the church the development of Eagle Eyrie. The church made a contribution of $25.00 for this development. Now each summer our people enjoy a week of fellowship and instruction at this beautiful place located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, just out from Lynchburg, Virginia.

  A building program was launched in 1951. Plans were drawn up for additional class rooms and a young people’s department. The ground work for this educational unit was laid but the building was not begun until after Mr. Brooks left. In recognition of the work Mr. Brooks had done, the auditorium in this new addition was named in his honor. The assembly room upstairs was named Townsend Hall in honor of Mr. Townsend who was pastor when the first addition was added to the church.

  Mr. Brooks left Deep Run in September 1952 to attend Southeastern Seminary. In his words, "This was indeed a venture on faith." The venture was a success; Mrs. Brooks had moved on to prosperous fields of service.

  The building program progressed. The plans, drawn by C. G. Whitaker, Sr., were accepted and the contract was awarded to Mr. Combs for $20-23.00 in October of 1952. This included heating the old building.

  Malcolm Hutton became pastor in November 1952, at an annual salary of $2700.00. Mr. Hutton being a single man, the church gave up the parsonage they had been renting.

  Ground breaking exercises for the educational unit were held November 9, 1952. For this building project the deacons and trustees negotiated a loan from First and Merchants National Bank for $15,000.00.

  Because this building program was in progress, it was not practical to have the usual Christmas Pageant in the church. In its place the "Living Nativity" Tableau was conducted on the church lawn. This has been an annual event to the present time. [1984-84]

  When this building program was completed, new carpet was placed on the sanctuary floor; walls and ceilings of the old class rooms were painted and the woodwork was refinished. A baptistery was installed, Mr. James Wilton, Sr. was the first candidate to be baptized. The total cost of this project was $25,121.50.

  This building was completed and Homecoming was observed June 28, 1953 at which time the building was dedicated. The final note for this project was paid October 1957 and an appropriate note burning service was observed. Mr. Hutton left the church July 1953 to attend Southeastern Seminary.

  In 1953 Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Lloyd and family deeded an acre of ground on Three Chopt Road, almost 3/4 mile from the church, to the church as a building site for a parsonage or to be sold and proceeds used for building purposes or to purchase other property.

  Dr. Raymond Brown, professor at the University of Richmond, was called as an interim pastor could be secured. He served from September 1953 to March 1955. Dr. Brown was influential in securing student help from the University to come to Deep Run and help with the work. Norman Bennett came as student assistant in November 1953. During this year a committee was working to secure a deed to the church property.

  In the summer of 1953 a piano for Townsend Hall was presented the church by Mrs. Myrtle Hudson Mitchell. November 1953 Mrs. F. G. Pruitt (now Mrs. Ferdinand Knoebel) gave the church a beautiful organ in memory of her husband, F. G. Pruitt. This was dedicated November 23,1953.

  Miss Elsie Lloyd was elected church organist. She has served in this position, faithfully and without compensation, to the present time. [1967]

  April 1954 a new piano appeared in the sanctuary. This was an anonymous gift, but it later leaked out the donor was Mrs. Pruitt.

  In 1955, the trustees with the permission of the church, exchanged a 0.996 acre parcel of land with Bernard and Rose Webb for 1.47 acres. This was done by the order of the Circuit Court of Henrico. By this exchange lines were straightened and the church acquired approximately 1/2 acre (minutes dated February 10, 1954).

  That year a sunrise service was held on Easter Sunday at 6:00 A.M. This was continued for a short time but was discontinued when services were begun at Westhampton Memorial Park. A service was held at the church in 1967 by the Short Pump Ruritan Club.

  The minutes of April 4, 1954 indicate there were some unwelcome guests attending church. These guests were little four footed animals. "A motion was made by Mrs. C. P. Deitrick and seconded by Mrs. George Wilton that rat poison be put in the kitchen to get rid of ‘rats in the building’." The old building that had housed the Delco Plant was torn down and removed from the church grounds.

  Much work went into making new bylaws. These were finally approved September 4, 1954. Printing 300 copies cost $94.00.

  A barbeque pit was built by the young men’s class. This has been enjoyed by the entire church family.

  Miss Eleanor Greenawalt was employed as Music Director in October 1954 at a salary of $40.00 per month. She stayed until December 1955.

  A contract was made with Cary Gee Piano Company to keep the pianos and the organ turned and in condition for $60.00 per year.

  The old bulletin board was replaced with a double face board in 1954. The first Christmas Candlelight Service was observed December 17, 1954. This became an annual event and is continued to the present time.

  In February 1955 a call was extended to Rev. Edward G. Lambert to become pastor at a salary of $3000.00 plus $1000.00 for expenses. Mr. Lambert was working with the Richmond Baptist Association and in a letter he stated he would not be free to assume full duties as pastor until March 15th. Mr. and Mrs. Lambert had one daughter, Bonnie Joy.

  During Mr. Lambert’s pastorate the church purchased from the Kessler Realty Corporation eight building lots adjoining the church property for the sum of $6000.00. That the deed to this property had been recorded was reported in the business meeting held February 8, 1956. The men of the church donated time and equipment to get the property cleaned up.

  A Junior Church, under the leadership of Mrs. Lambert, was organized for children up to 11 or 12 years of age.

  An old communion set, gift from Mrs. Fannie Higgenbotham, had been discarded. This was restored, properly engraved and given a place of distinction in "Brooks Auditorium". Mr. W. L. Jones, Sr. built the cabinet to hold this set. At the same time he made a cabinet for the trophies the soft-ball teams were winning, When this communion set was given is not definitely known, but from the Ladies’ Aid Society Minutes we find Mr. Higgenbotham active in 1905. She died June 18, 1918.

  In October 1955, a new communion service was given by Mr. and Mrs. Clarence B. Bennett. This service was given in memory of their parents and sisters.

  During this period there was a well organized Women’s Missionary Union under the leadership of Mrs. W. L. Jones, Jr. The report made in July 1955 stated the Woman’s Missionary Society, Girl’s Auxiliary and Royal Ambassadors were making good progress. Week of prayer for both Foreign and Home Missions had been observed. The Lottie Moon offering for Foreign Missions was $44.25. The Annie Armstrong Offering for Home Missions was $28.16. Many mission causes were sponsored during 1955. Among these listed were the Orphanage, Home for the Aged, Baptist Hospital and Vacation bible School. The contribution to the Cooperative Program amounted to $616.25. The total for all organizations was $886.72.

  Homecoming, which had become an annual event, was observed August 28 with Rev. Carl C. Collins as guest speaker. A report of the revival which was held in November with Rev. James Burkes of Norfolk as guest speaker, showed 20 addition to the church; 17 by baptism and 3 by letter.

  That Christmas a "White Gift and Candlelight Service" was held. Among gifts to the church were: Refrigerator donated by Mr. Edward Clay; Bookcase, Mrs. John Lloyd, Jr. (This bookcase had been made by her husband, who before his death, was a very active member of the church. A plaque was placed on the bookcase in memory of Mr. Lloyd.); Tablecloths, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Whitaker; Rug for Townsend Hall , Mrs. Nellie Cornwell; Communion cloths; Mrs. Mildred Rigsby and Mrs. Bessie Williams Monetary gifts amounting to $85.28 were given by friends present.

  In 1956, Mrs. W. L. Jones, Jr. served as superintendent of the Sunday School. As far as records show, this was the first time a female had held this office at Deep Run. One of the outstanding achievements of this year was the emphasis on visitation. This paid dividends as seventeen new members reported having come into the Sunday School between October and December.

  At a meeting held April 23, 1956 all deed of bargain and sale, plot of church property and other important documents were taken from the Safety Deposit Box and read to the church. All of these are named in detail in the minutes of that meeting.

  Other important events of 1956 were: For the first time the sexton was covered by Social Security. A new aluminum bulletin board was made for the church by Eddie Gershowitz. That year the Sunday School picnic was carried to Bear Creek Lake in Cumberland County. This is still the site of our annual picnic.

  Mr. James Davenport came to the church as Choir Director in October 1956. He was paid $10.00 a Sunday. While there he married Mess Patricia Cannon, who was baptized at Deep Run Church. Mr. Davenport is now Minister of Music at Tablenacle Baptist Church in Richmond.

  In February 1957 the porch that had been a part of the church, perhaps from the time it was rebuilt in 1888, was enclosed making a vestibule. This added to the comfort of the church.

  In September, 1957 the church voted to contribute 1/2 to the support of Rev. Richard Morris as a missionary to Formosa. June 29, 1958, the church observed "Missionary Day" and had Mr. and Mrs. Morris and their four daughters as guests.

  July 1958, a parcel of land approximately 1 1/4 acres on the west side of the church was purchased from the Gulf Oil Company for the sum of $3250.00. The church voted to use $2250.00 of the building fund to pay on this land. With a check for $1000.00 from one of the members (no name given) the land was paid for in full and deeded to the church.

  On August 6, 1958, the church voted to license Cecil Cornwell to preach. On Sunday, August 10th, a service was held at Deep Run at which time Mr. William Cullers delivered the message and Cecil was licensed. After doing work at the University of Richmond and Howard College, Birmingham, Alabama, he attended Golden Gate Seminary, Mill Valley, California. While there he pastored a church for one year. At the present time he is working toward his Master’s Degree at the University of Georgia. We are indeed proud of Cecil, our first son to enter the ministry. Cecil is the son of Mrs. Nellie Cornwell Lawrence and Mr. Jerry Cornwell. He is the grandson of Mr. Claude P. Deitrick, who was until his death on January 31, 1967, our oldest member (in age-not membership). Mr. Claude Deitrick would have been 95 on February 10, 1967.

  In 1958 the Young Men’s class took as a project the building of an Educational Building. The plans drawn by Stanley Lundberg, showed eight classrooms and a general assembly room. Later it was decided to put in a kitchen. The cost was estimated at $4300.00. This building was completed and dedicated September 13, 1959.

  Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Whitaker, Sr. gave a stove for the new kitchen. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour gave a pressure cooker. A new refrigerator was purchased. Miss Doris Lloyd donated a piano. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lundberg and Mrs. Hattie Oliver gave the kitchen sink and wall cabinets. No doubt other gifts were made, but they were not recorded.

  Room was provided and equipped for a nursery. The nursery which had been in a room of Brooks Auditorium was now in the new building. This has been a wonderful help to mothers with small children. This new building necessitated a new well. The church selected the location and Matthews Well Drilling Company was employed to drill the well at $5.00 per foot. The well was 250 feet deep.

  Prior to, or around this time, a clock was given to the Church for the sanctuary by Mr. and Mrs. Merritt J. Williams. This seems a very appropriate gift for until his death in 1956, Mr. Williams was always the first person to arrive at church. He was always standing in front of the church door ready to greet, even the early arrivals, with a friendly smile and a warm handshake.

  Mr. Edward Stansfield was employed as Music Director from October 8, 1958 to May 15, 1959 for $10.00 a Sunday. Mr. Stansfield was a ministerial student at Union Theological Seminary and was well like by the choir. When he left a love gift of $57.00 was given him, he is now pastor of Corinth Baptist Church in New Kent County.

  Mr. William Rife came as Music Director October 1959 for $75.00 per month. From minutes recorded he was active in Church affairs other than music.

  The first telephone to be installed in the church was in January, 1960. This had been a great help to the church.

  The church minutes of May 11,1960 reported that a dinner meeting had been held and plans for forming a Brotherhood were discussed. The church voted to sponsor the organization. The first meeting was held May 26 and W. L. Jones, Jr. was elected president, W. B. Lloyd, C. R. Lane, and Charles Barnett were vice presidents and Clarence B. Bennett, secretary. They took over the Royal Ambassadors. This organization has meant much to the church by helping people in need and in sponsoring social functions for the church. Their favorite function is a "cook". The men assume the role as cooks. Not only hamburgers and hot dogs, but "Brunswick Stew" is one the their specialties. When the men, usually Mr. Grover Kelsey and Mr. W. B. Lloyd, don their aprons and chef caps and prepare the huge pot of stew, the members and friends of the church know there is a real treat in store. Mr. Clarence Bennett is usually in charge of the bread and butter and you are sure to get a liberal cut of French bread.

  One September 30, 1960 we had on roll 377 members. On October 5,1960 we held our regular business meeting of the church with 35 members present. As the pastor, Edward G. Lambert, Chairman of the Deacons, and Secretary of the Deacon Board had resigned, we had no moderator. The meeting was called to order by Mr. Hunter Browning, Sunday School Superintendent. The floor was opened for nominations for moderator of the meeting. Mr. Browning was elected permanent moderator for the year.

  The Clerk, Miss Bessie Browning, read 91 names of people who wished to be transferred to Parham Road Church. These transfers were due to the fact that there had been a division in our church over doctrine, and on October 2 a group left our church and met in the Tuckahoe Junior High School. They had organized the previous Monday under the name of "Parham Road Baptist Church". Rev. Edward G. Lambert served as their first pastor.

  Among those members left at Deep Run there existed a spirit of cooperation and congeniality. They pulled things together and secured Edward Stansfield to supply until they could secure a pastor.

  At the October 1960 business meeting the following pulpit committee members were unanimously elected: Mrs. Daisy Collawn, Mr. W. B. Lloyd, Mr. Eddie Gershowitz and Mr. Raymond Deitrick. At the time of the division the only two active deacons left at Deep Run Church were Mr. Jacob Deitrick and Mr. Stanley Lundberg. Mr. C. P. Deitrick and Mr. J. W. Kirby were called back into active service.

  Present at this meeting was Mr. William Cullers, Secretary of the Dover Association. He suggested that we secure an interim pastor.

  At the November meeting the church voted upon recommendation of the Pulpit Committee that we call Dr. O. W. Rhodenhiser, Professor of Bible at the University of Richmond, to become interim pastor at a salary of $250.00 per month, to begin the first Sunday in December. He stated that he would take care of the two services on Sunday and any emergency that might arise, visit the sick in the hospitals, attend business meetings that might arise, visit the sick in the hospitals, attend business meetings and deacons’ meeting. He suggested that prayer meetings be conducted by various laymen. This proved to be a high point in the life of our church. We had many members to volunteer to conduct these services and the whole body was drawn closer together.

  On February 6, 1961 the church was called into a brief business session immediately following the morning worship service. Dr. Rhodenhiser stated the purpose of the meeting before turning the floor over to the moderator. He advised that Mr. W. B. Lloyd, our lay representative to the Dover Association, would be attending the Executive Committee meeting on Tuesday night, February 7 at Fort Lee Church when the matter of accepting the Parham Road Baptist Church into the Dover Association would be discussed. A statement composed by The Deacon Board and Dr. Rhodenhiser was presented to the church for action. The statement was accepted by the church and Mr. Lloyd was instructed to read it at the Executive Meeting. The statement is as follows:

  "The Deep Run Baptist Church here by goes on record as not wishing to participate in the decision of the Dover Association concerning the admission of the Parham Road Baptist Church into the Association. The Deep Run Baptist Church does not desire that its past differences in doctrine and policy with the membership of the Parham Road Baptist Church should influence the other Churches of the Association. The Deep Run Baptist Church will continue to follow its historic practice of cooperation with the Association in the spirit of complete fellowship."

  In December1960 the members of the choir purchased nine robes as a gift to the church to be used by the church as they so desired. In May of 1961 some of the ladies of the church painted several of the class rooms. The ladies, along with the men, cut the grass the spring and summer of that year in order to curtail expenses. During this trying year all activities of the church were carried on. We had an active Woman’s Missionary Society, Brotherhood, Royal Ambassadors, Girl’s Auxiliary, Sunbeams, as well as our fully organized Sunday School. We had Sunday night activities for the adults and youth. Softball teams were organized for both the ladies and men. We had our Cantata at Christmas, Candlelight Communion Service at Easter, Sunday School Picnic at Bear Creek Lake in June, Vacation Bible School, Brotherhood Cook Out and Homecoming in August.

  During the time Dr. Rhodenhiser was our interim pastor, the church in business session adopted a long range plan for the future growth of the church. This was a recommendation from a special planning committee which had met at the church on March 13, 1961. The committee was composed of the building committee, premises committee, deacons, deaconesses, trustees and Dr. Rhodenhiser. This long range plan was unanimously accepted by the church and is as follow:

  The long range plan for future growth includes three steps: (A) Immediate, (B) Near future, (C) Far future.
         A. Immediate
              1. The surveying of the church property.
              2. Grading of the land around the church.
              3. Painting of all three buildings white.
         B. Near future
              1. The building of a parsonage.
              2. The landscaping of the church grounds.
         C. Far future
              1. After a survey, plot, plan and description of buildings be sent to the Southern Baptist Convention for Architect to                   examine and make recommendation for a future Church.
  At the time we are writing this history, 1967, the first two objectives of the plan for future growth, immediate and near future have been achieved.

  At the August 9, 1961 monthly business meeting the Pulpit Committee unanimously recommended that the church extend an invitation to the Rev. P. L. Cumbia to be pastor of Deep Run Church. The recommendation was unanimously carried. He was to speak the fourth Sunday in August after which a vote was to be immediately taken at a called business meeting of the congregation. If accepted by the church he was to begin his duties October 1, 1961. He was accepted on August 27th without an opposing vote.

  Mr. Cumbia, who is still our pastor, was born in Brodnax, Brunswick College, University of Richmond and Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He served in the United States Army Air Force from 1943 to 1946. Before coming to Deep Run he was pastor of Menokin and Nomini Baptist Churches. He is married to the former Mary Maxwell Acree of Farnham, Richmond County, Virginia. She formerly taught in high schools in Virginia and North Carolina. They have two boys: Allen Lesley and Dean Philip.

  During his pastorate Mr. Cumbia has introduced many new and helpful improvements to our church. He started the weekly "Newsletter" in December of 1961. In 1962 Teacher Training Classes were organized and we had many members are dedicated are held throughout the year. We had a Standard Sunday School from 1962 to 1964 under his leadership. We had a Standard Vacation Bible School from 1962 to 1966.

  Much progress has been made since he has become our pastor, "Brother Phil" and "Max" together with their boys, Allen and Dean have truly become a part of our church family. It has been six fruitful years we have spent together as pastor and people. Max, with her quiet manner, has endeared herself to us all. Many a sick person is not only visited by her but usually is the recipient of some appetizing dish she has prepared. No person in the church family, or indeed, in the community, is without assistance from our pastor as soon as the need is known. He is interested in civic affairs. We have watched with interest and affections the boys have grown from 2 1/2 and 4 years of age to youngsters attending school We feel fortunate that he came to our church at such a crucial time in our history.

  Miss Betty Jean Seymour, Director of Religious Activities at Westhampton College, was employed upon recommendation of the Music Committee in September 1961, as Minister of Music. She was with us for 4 years. During this time she presented the church with an imported communion cloth which she had purchased in Europe in the summer of 1963. She resigned in September 1965 to work with college students attending River Road Baptist Church. She is now teaching at Baptist College at Charleston and in the fall will enter Duke University Divinity School for further graduate work.

  During 1962 many improvements were made to the church including a four foot walk from the church to the Fellowship Hall and a three foot walk to the Beginner Department. Mr. Onnie Williams gave the registers in the Sanctuary. Screens were given the church for the Sanctuary an Educational Building by Mr. and Mrs. Pat Lawrence. We acquired an addressograph machine through the efforts of Mr. W. L. Jones, Jr. from the Richmond Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad Co. A steeple was built on the church by some of the men of the church. A public address system was given for the steeple in memory of Mr. and Mrs. James Edwin browning by their children and grandchildren. In this year, Miss Nancy Richardson, a student at Westhampton College, came as Youth Director. In 1963 the cross which hangs in the front of the Sanctuary was given by her when she left our membership and upon our recommendation entered Southeastern Baptist Seminary. She is now Associate Director of Religious Life, East Campus, Duke University.

  In 1963 plans for the parsonage were drawn by Mr. Stanley Lundberg and the parsonage was built by Lundberg & Deitrick, Contractors, and was dedicated August 18, 1963. The speaker for this occasion was Dr. Rhodenhiser, our former interim pastor, who is now Chairman of the Department of Religion, University of Richmond.

  James Carr and Tracy Floyd, students at the University of Richmond, were student pastors for the year 1963-64. In May1966 Tracy returned from Southeastern Seminary and preached a revival at our church.

  In 1963 the church adopted the Forward Finance Program and Unified Budge.

  In 1964 we papered the Sanctuary through the efforts of Mr. Kenneth Hart and the outside of the church was painted. Also, in 1964 the Wednesday family night supper program was adopted. Mr. John Pangola had prepared the food for these suppers since that time. He has also been a very of kindness he has shown our fellowship. Our church budget that year was $24,725.00. New Baptist Hymnals were purchased this year. Some were given as memorials.

  In February 1964 the church employed Mr. and Mrs. Robert Tuner to direct the Youth Work of the church and assist with the choirs. In September 30 of that year we had 297 members.

  In 1965, a piano was given to the church by Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Deitrick. Also, a mimeograph machine was purchased. The budget for this year was $26,800.00.

  In March 1966 we had Mr. Stafford Efford, an architect, to meet with the church to discuss future buildings. In May a playground was built in the rear of the fellowship hall for the children of the church. Mr. and Mrs. Turner left our church in September 1966 to begin Youth Work at Grace Baptist Church.

  On October 1, 1966 our church had 302 members. Mrs. Lucille Westbrook came as Choir Director. We purchased a tractor power mover for cutting the grass. The church is now in the process of selling he lots given by the W. B. Lloyd family.

  A new pulpit bible was given by Bessie and Stanley Browning, Mr. Estelle Kirby and Mrs. Hulda Ellis in memory of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Browning.

  The year, 1967, has been a good one. We have many plans for future expansion. Our building committee is working to make a new building a reality.

  We close this history. Every effort has been made to make it as accurate as possible As we and the generations look back and see the hardships that have been encountered, endured and conquered by those who have worked and gone on to their reward, may we be inspired to press forward. May we accept the challenge that is ours and write pages in the history of this grand old church that will bring glory and honor to its name.

  The future of Deep Run Church lies in the hands of the members. What that future will be depends upon our faith and trust in God. Nothing is impossible with Him. We know what He has done. Dare we doubt what He will do?

The torch has been lighted.
‘Twas lighted long ago
By brave and fearless men.
They kept the light aglow.

It’s our task to keep it burning,
Burning clear and bright;
That men who travel onward
May be guided by its light.

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Update of History of Deep Run Church

1984

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

  The committee for this section (Part V) of the History of Deep Run Church is grateful for the assistance of members who have provided information, photographs and encouragement. It is our hope and prayer that this history will impress upon us the heritage we share and the challenge before us.
  Members of this committee 1981-1984 are:
Miss Bessie Browning
Mrs. Florence Browning
Mr. Roger Blackwell
Mr. Raymond Deitrick
Mr. Leslie H. Shepherd, Jr.
Mrs. Betty Walker
Mrs. Ruth Watson
Mrs. Elsie L. Shepherd, Chairperson

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Part V – Pressing On

1967-1984

  As the years passed, advancements and improvements wee made. A gift from the Browning Family has been an inspiration to all who come to church. The chimes in the steeple play music each Sunday6 morning and contribute to the atmosphere of worship. This sound system has been updated by a gift form Mrs. Curtis Houck in memory of her husband, the work and installation being done by Mr. Delmar Larrick.

  Following the long-range plan, ground was broken on March 98, 1969 for the Children’s Building to provide improved and adequate classrooms for those ages nursery through twelve years. The final payment on this air conditioned brick building was made in April 1981.

  On October 26, 1969, the first Navy Sunday was observed following the suggestion of Mr. Clarence Bennett, a 30-year retired Navy Warrant Officer. This service, under the direction of Mr. Bennett, has since become known as Armed Forces Day and is an annual observance. Following the first Navy Sunday, Mr. Bennett made this comment: "In speaking at the first Navy Sunday observance, I saw a need far greater than recognizing the Navy. I saw the need to recognize all those in all branches of the service who so faithfully served to protect and defend our country, and t remember the sacrifices they made to protect our freedom. Thus, this Sunday was designated as Armed Forces Day." At this annual observance, the service is conducted by men of Deep Run who have served our service. This service impresses on all of us the importance of our freedom and liberty and the price that had been paid for it.

  In 1970, an extension was made to the sanctuary and a large vestibule included. We are grateful to Mr. Charles Troy, Sr. for laying the beautiful brick flooring in this vestibule and to Mr. Raymond Deitrick who was contractor for this project. Some of the old timber secured in his renovation was used in the construction of the fireplace mantle in the Fellowship Hall.

  On December 20, 1970 the church gave our pastor, the Rev. Philip Cumbia, a new automobile to aid in his ministry and service as he traveled throughout the community in answer to many calls for assistance.

  A kindergarten and nursery school was begun in September 1971 with Mrs. Betty Walker as director, and Mrs. Etta Bethel and Mrs. Frances Rogers as teachers. After three years, the kindergarten was discontinued. The nursery school for three and four year old children has grown and continues its outreach to the community. Other teachers in the school have been Mrs. Linda Kelly, Mrs. Gail Samuels, Mrs. Anne Attkisson, Mrs. Dale Swink, and Mrs. Betty Crane. Mrs. Christine Trent replaced Mrs. Samuels in 1984. Mrs. Lucille Westbrook became director of the school in 1980.

  Under the leadership of Rev. Cumbia the church began the practice of recognizing our high school and college graduates with the presentation of a gift to each one.

  A Boy Scout Troop #775 was organized in 1975 with Mr. Addison Lewis as scoutmaster and Mr. Tommy Wood as assistant scoutmaster. The scout troop disbanded after several years. A Girl Scout Troop was started in 1977 under the leadership of Mrs. Linda Andrus and Mrs. Laura Barnett. This troop #125 continues, and Brownie Troop has also been started.

  The fist pictorial church directory was published in 1975 with a good response from the members. Again in 1979 a full color pictorial directory was published.

  Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Kennedy, Jr. gave a piano to the church on April 7, 1974 in memory of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Kennedy, Sr., and his aunt Miss Rebecca Kennedy.

  A Christmas Post Office was begun in December 1974. A decorated box was placed in the vestibule in which cards were deposited and then distributed following services on Sunday mornings and evenings. Another box alongside the card box was for postage which would have been used to mail the cards. This ‘postage money’ was given to the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering and a display of candles is placed at the front of the church. For each $100.00 contributed, a candle is lit and this is another inspiring scene.

  In the spring of 1976 an azalea garden was started in honor and memory of mothers and fathers. Plants were donated by members and friends and the garden has continued to grow as other plants are added.

  A Homecoming Service was observed on October10, 1976 with the Rev. Malcolm M. Hutton, a former pastor, as guest speaker.

  In November 1976, the church accepted a goal of $100 per month to aid in the resettlement of a Vietnamese family. This goal had been pledged by classes and individuals at Deep Run. The family became self-supporting in about six months and requested our assistance be discontinued.

  Mrs. Lucille Westbrook served as Music Director for ten years and was succeeded by Mrs. Ann Larrick who became Director of Music and Youth in November 1976, a position she held until August 1982.

  An oil painting of the old church building was painted by Mrs. Katherine Henley Ellis and was presented to the church by Mrs. Lucille Henley Westbrook. This painting now hangs over the fireplace in the Fellowship Hall.

  The sanctuary was air conditioned in 1977, adding to the comfort of the congregation. This was made possible by the generosity of many men of the church who donated time, materials and labor to this project. Many members also made monetary contributions toward this endeavor and the church was saved several thousand dollars by their labor of love.

  City water and sewerage was obtained by the church in 1978.

  In the spring of 1980 a new pulpit stand was given to the church in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Bennett by members who wished to remain anonymous.

  For many years Baptist Men's Day had been observed by Deep Run in January when the men of the church are in complete charge of the service. These men challenge us and we are glad to know there are capable men in our membership.

  Each year we observe Youth Week when the young people of the Sunday School are given the opportunity to teach Sunday School classes and take charge of the worship services on Sunday and during the week. A large wooden key, symbolic of the church key, is presented to the Youth Pastor with the challenge to carry on the activities of the week. Usually the youth prepare and serve the Wednesday night supper, and have a Youth Banquet on Saturday evening. On Sunday, after presiding at the morning worship service, the ‘key’ is returned to the pastor. We are fortunate to have had young people through the years to fill these position sand many have grown up to assume places of leadership in the church.

  On August 15, 1978, the Rev. and Mrs. Philip Cumbia celebrated their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. The church honored them with a reception and presented them with a silver service and pitcher.

  On December 31, 1979, Mrs. Elsie L. Shepherd retired after serving as church pianist and organist since January 1, 1935. At a morning worship service in March 1980, the members of deep Run presented her with a beautiful silver casserole in recognition of her many years of faithful and voluntary service. In the intervening years since Mrs. Shepherd’s retirement, there have been other organists to fill this position – all voluntary and without compensation : Mrs. Shirley Barwick, Mr. Herbert S. Lipscmb, Jr., Mrs. Judith Cleek, and Mrs. Lucille Westbrook who offered her services in May of 1983 and is still serving in that capacity.

  Mrs. Glenna Proffit became church pianist around 1962 and has served faithfully, efficiently and without compensation. In 1983, she requested a leave of absence, and Mrs. Sandra T. Traylor is serving as pianist now.

  Mrs. Betty Walker, the first church secretary was hired in March of 1972 and served through October of 1980. Mrs. Walker also served as the church treasurer from 1973 through December of 1980, succeeding Mr. Karl H. Collawn who served as treasurer of the church for 15 years, 1958-1973. Memorial monies given after his death in 1973 were used for athletic equipment. Mr. Collawn, a quiet dedicated servant of God, was an uncompensated faithful member of our church.

  In 1980, Mrs. Lucille Westbrook succeeded Mrs. Walker as secretary.

  After a lapse of several years, the Living Nativity was presented on the church lawn again in December 1981. Attendance was good and the presentation was greatly enjoyed, being inspirational and emphasizing the true meaning of the Christmas Season.

  In May 1980, the Rev. Philip L. Cumbia was presented an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the University of Richmond.

  Dr. Philip L. Cumbia left Deep Run in August 1980 to accept an associate pastorate at the First Baptist Church in Richmond. The pulpit was filled with supply preachers until August 31, 1981. During this time, the University of Richmond bestowed an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree upon him also.

  The Rev. Matther Davidson began serving as pastor of Deep Run on September 1,1981.

  In May 1981 the Bethany Sunday School Class started a Scholarship Memorial Fund in memory of members and friends. This fund has grown since its inception, and the hope is that it will help some young person in a Christian related vocation. At this printing this fund has exceeded $1,000.00, and we trust will continue to grow. Chime records were given to the church in memory of Miss Stanley Browning and Mrs. Hulda B. Ellis in October 1981.

  During the 1970’s the church began an annual luncheon for older citizens of the church and community. The luncheon is usually held during revival week with the revival speaker presenting a message to these persons who may find it difficult to attend the evening services. The luncheon has been very successful and has become known as the Friendly Neighbors Luncheon. It is a time of fun and fellowship when our church reaches out to older citizens of the larger community.

  The annual Brunswick Stew is another occasion of fun and fellowship for the church family and friends from the community. This event has become a fall tradition on Deep Run Hill, having been started in 1959, with Mr. W. B. Lloyd, chairman. Mr. Grover Kelsey succeeded Mr. Lloyd as chairman, and has become known as "Mr. Brunswick Stew", and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gregory have been valuable aides to him in this event.

  Mary Warr, a senior fro the University of Richmond, served as youth director from the fall of 1982 through April 1983.

  Amy Schaaf, now Mrs. Bruce Swartz, also a senior from the University of Richmond, began serving as director of music during the fall of 1982.

  After serving as pastor for two years, the Rev. Matthew Davidson resigned effective September 30, 1983. Highlights of his two years pastorate were the Master Life Program which he taught at Deep run as well as in the Dover Association and at Eagle Eyrie. Deep Run also participated in the celebrating of the 200th Anniversary of the Dover Association and in an exchange program of revival speakers with England at which time we were host to the Rev. Derek Cook, Headmaster of Mouthlock Christian Teaching Center, which is a training center for Evangelists.

  On February 1, 1984, the Rev. Edgar Burkholder assumed his duties as Interim Pastor. He and his wife, Beverly, have been a blessing to our congregation and during his ministry there have been many additions to the membership of the church and a good spirit of cooperation and fellowship exists.

  A note of interest may be inserted at this point. Deep Run is a church of stability and its roots of membership are enduring. In some instances w can trace thee, four and five generations of families who have been life-long members the this church and we can be sure that there are many who have been members for fifty years or more. We feel proud and blessed to have this treasured heritage. This is not to say that Deep Run is not a progressive church, for we are continuing to receive new members and welcome new blood into our fellowship.

  An oil painting of the old church building was painted by Mrs. Katherine Henley Ellis and was presented to the church by Mrs. Lucille Henley Westbrook. This painting now hangs over the fireplace in ghe Fellowship Hall.

  The sanctuary was air conditioned in 1977, adding to the comfort of the congregation. This was made possible by the generosity of many men of the church who donated time, materials and labor to this project. Many members also made monetary contributions toward this endeavor and the church was saved several thousand dollars by their labor of love.

  City water and sewerage was obtained by the church in 1978.

  In the spring of 1980 a new pulpit stand was given to the church in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Bennett by members who wished to remain anonymous.

  For many years Baptist Men's Day had been observed by Deep Run in January when the men of the church are in complete charge of the service. These men challenge us and we are glad to know there are capable men in our membership.

  Each year we observe Youth Week when the young people of the Sunday School are given the opportunity to teach Sunday School classes and take charge of the worship services on Sunday and during the week. A large wooden key, symbolic of the church key, is presented to the Youth Pastor with the challenge to carry on the activities of the week. Usually the youth prepare and serve the Wednesday night supper, and have a Youth Banquet on Saturday evening. On Sunday, after presiding at the morning worship service, the ‘key’ is returned to the pastor. We are fortunate to have had young people through the years to fill these position sand many have grown up to assume places of leadership in the church.

  On August 15, 1978, the Rev. and Mrs. Philip Cumbia celebrated their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. The church honored them with a reception and presented them with a silver service and pitcher.

  On December 31, 1979, Mrs. Elsie L. Shepherd retired after serving as church pianist and organist since January 1, 1935. At a morning worship service in March 1980, the members of deep Run presented her with a beautiful silver casserole in recognition of her many years of faithful and voluntary service. In the intervening years since Mrs. Shepherd’s retirement, there have been other organists to fill this position – all voluntary and without compensation : Mrs. Shirley Barwick, Mr. Herbet S. Lipscmb, Jr., Mrs. Judith Cleek, and Mrs Lucille Westbrook who offered her services in May of 1983 and is still serving in that capacity.

  Mrs. Glenna Proffit became church pianist around 1962 and has served faithfully, efficiently and without compensation. In 1983, she requested a leave of absence, and Mrs. Sandra T. Traylor is serving as pianist now.

  Mrs. Betty Walker, the first church secretary was hired in March of 1972 and served through October of 1980. Mrs. Walker also served as the church treasurer from 1973 through December of 1980, succeeding Mr. Karl H. Collawn who served as treasurer of the church for 15 years, 1958-1973. Memorial monies given after his death in 1973 were used for athletic equipment. Mr. Collawn, a quiet dedicated servant of God, was an uncompensated faithful member of our church.

  In 1980, Mrs. Lucille Westbrook succeeded Mrs. Walker as secretary.

  After lapse of several years, the Living Nativity was presented on the church lawn again in December 1981. Attendance was good and the presentation was greatly enjoyed, being inspirational and emphasizing the true meaning of the Christmas Season.

  In May 1980, the Rev. Philip L. Cumbia was presented an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the University of Richmond.

  Dr. Philip L. Cumbia left Deep Run in August 1980 to accept an associate pastorate at the First Baptist Church in Richmond. The pulpit was filled with supply preachers until August 31, 1981. During this time, the University of Richmond bestowed an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree upon him also.

  The Rev. Matther Davidson began serving as pastor of Deep Run on September 1,1981.

  In May 1981 the Bethany Sunday School Class started a Scholarship Memorial Fund in memory of members and friends. This fund has grown since its inception, and the hope is that it will help some young person in a Christian related vocation. At this printing this fund has exceeded $1,000.00, and we trust will continue to grow. Chime records were given to the church in memory of Miss Stanley Browning and Mrs. Hulda B. Ellis in October 1981.

  During the 1970’s the church began an annual luncheon for older citizens of the church and community. The luncheon is usually held during revival week with the revival speaker presenting a message to these persons who may find it difficult to attend the evening services. The luncheon has been very successful and has become known as the Friendly Neighbors Luncheon. It is a time of fun and fellowship when our church reaches out to older citizens of the larger community.

  The annual Brunswick Stew is another occasion of fun and fellowship for the church family and friends from the community. This event has become a fall tradition on Deep Run Hill, having been started in 1959, with Mr. W. B. Lloyd, chairman. Mr. Grover Kelsey succeeded Mr. Lloyd as chairman, and has become known as "Mr. Brunswick Stew", and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gregory have been valuable aides to him in this event.

  Mary Warr, a senior fro the University of Richmond, served as youth director from the fall of 1982 through April 1983.

  Amy Schaaf, now Mrs. Bruce Swartz, also a senior from the University of Richmond, began serving as director of music during the fall of 1982.

  After serving as pastor for two years, the Rev. Matthew Davidson resigned effective September 30, 1983. Highlights of his two years pastorate were the Master Life Program which he taught at Deep run as well as in the Dover Association and at Eagle Eyrie. Deep Run also participated in the celebrating of the 200th Anniversary of the Dover Association and in an exchange program of revival speakers with England at which time we were host to the Rev. Derek Cook, Headmaster of Mouthlock Christian Teaching Center, which is a training center for Evangelists.

  On February 1, 1984, the Rev. Edgar Burkholder assumed his duties as Interim Pastor. He and his wife, Beverly, have been a blessing to our congregation and during his ministry there have been many additions to the membership of the church and a good spirit of cooperation and fellowship exists.

  A note of interest may be inserted at this point. Deep Run is a church of stability and its roots of membership are enduring. In some instances w can trace thee, four and five generations of families who have been life-long members the this church and we can be sure that there are many who have been members for fifty years or more. We feel proud and blessed to have this treasured heritage. This is not to say that Deep Run is not a progressive church, for we are continuing to receive new members and welcome new blood into our fellowship.

  Former pastors of Deep Run who not hold the Doctor of Divinity Degree are:

Arthur W. Rich, Jr.
Carl A. Collins
W. Franklin Cale
Philip L. Cumbia
Herbert R. Carlton
  There may be other former pastors of Deep Run who now hold Doctor of Divinity Degrees and of whom we are not aware.
  In July of 1984 a project was begun to have cushions installed on the pews in the sanctuary. These cushion of bushed red velvet to complement the interior of the sanctuary of the 18th century period, have been installed, as well as carpet of the same color.

  Also at the same time, a fund was begun to have the church cemetery across Three Chopt Road from the church and those sections adjoining the church place in perpetual care. This should prove to be an advantage to the church, as this cemetery has been cared for on a voluntary basis by church members.

  As we begin another phase of our church life, it is with the prayer that our church will remain united in Christian fellowship and that as we search for a full-time pastor we shall seek the Lord’s guidance for the man who will lead us as we continue to serve in His name. In the words of the Apostle Paul found in 1 Corinthians 15:58, "Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labor is not in vain in the Lord."

  The torch we carry today – dedication to the worship of God and the proclamation of His gospel – has endured in this church for over two hundred years. It is our obligation and privilege to pass it on to future generations.

 The torch we hold was given to us
By other’s hands we know;
We hold it high that all may see
Its brightly gleaming glow.
Let us then be true and faithful
As we walk this earthly sod,
That our Lord Christ be exalted
And men may come to worship God.

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  The following have served Deep Run Baptist Church since its beginning as:

  PASTORS

Peter Cottrell 1792 R. E. L. Hayes 1919
Elders Courtney and Webber 1793-1798 W. W. Townsend 1921
Elder Bernard Reynolds 1798-1824 Noah B. Farris 1924-1925
Elder Eli Ball 1825-1834 C. J. Ashley 1926
M. L. Jones 1835-1840 Gordon L. Price 1927
Reuben Ford 1841 R. Cole Lee 1930
John Hay 1846 W. Franklin Cale 1932
Joseph Rocke 1847 Arthur W. Rich, Jr. 1934
W. G. Thomasson 1849 Philip W. Tomlinson 1937
G. G. Exall 1850-1857 Carl A. Collins 1938
H. D. Nuckols 1858 E. Maynard Adams 1940
H. Satterwhite 1867-1877 Woodrow W. Herrin 1942
E. Harrison 1878 Harold White 1943
Arthur E. Cox 1880 Ira S. Harrell 1945
J. W. Reynolds 1883 J. Vernon Brooks 1947
J. B. Cook 1885 Malcolm M. Hutton 1952
H. W. Jones 1887 Dr. Ramond B. Brown 1953 (Interim)
R. W. Cridlin 1888 Edward G. Lambert 1955
E. Harrison 1891 Dr. O. W. Rhodenhizer 1960 (Interim)
Jr. R. Wilkinson 1894 Dr. Philip Lesley Cumbia 1961
E. T. Poulson 1901 Herbert Raymond Carlton 1980 (Interim)
L. L. Gwaltney 1903 Matthew Davidson 1981
J. O. Kirk 1904 Edgar Burkholder 1984 (Interim)
L. W. Smith 1905 David Cooper 1986-1987
Samuel Livingston Naff 1905-1909 Dr. O. W. Rhodenhiser 1988 (Interim)
J. A. Clarke 1909 Dr. Ernest J. Boyd 1988
A. L. Shumate 1911
W. J. Yeaman 1912
W. Herbert Brannock 1913
Robert Lord Bausum 1916
S. Roy Orrell 1917
Mr. Sheppard 1918
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CLERKS

J. E. Jude Miss Sadie Bowles
B. F. Bowles Mrs. Carl A. Collins
Robert Scott Mrs. J. W. Jackson
J. L. Henley Mrs. Nellie Cornwell
W. H. Walker Mrs. Margaret Henson
W. S. Jones Miss Bessie Browning
C. A. Bowles Mrs. Doris Pruitt
W. W. Townsend Mrs. Ann Lundberg
J. H. Eubank Mrs. Graham Bryant
Miss Nellie Deitrick Mrs. Florence Browning
Miss Lorelle Mrs. Terry Jones
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Bibliography

Dover Association Minutes, 1792-1930
Little, Lewis: Imprisoned Preachers and Religious Liberty in Virginia
Taylor, George Braxton: Virginia Baptist Ministers, Vol. 1-6
Moore: History of Henrico Parish, 1611-1904
Ryland, Dr. Garnett: Baptist of Virginia
White, Dr. Blanche: Richmond Baptist Working together
Beale; Semple’s Historyof Rise and Progress of Baptist in Virginia
Cooke: The Story of Baptists in All Ages and Countries
Ladies’ Aid Society Minutes, 1905-1905
Ladies’ Aid Society Minutes, 1933-1945
Brydon, McClaren: Highlights Along The Road to the Anglican Church
Deep Run Baptist Church Business Meeting Minutes, 1967-1984
Religious Herald, 1828-1858
Deep Run Baptist Church Business Meeting Minutes, 1967-1984
Deep Run Baptist Church Bulletins of Special Events and Occasions, 1967-1984
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Deep Run Baptist Church

Celebrating Our 200th Anniversary

1791-1991

A Brief Historical Account –
for a more complete history, see previous pages
"History of Deep Run Church"
Richmond, Virginia
1991

  Deep Run Church as it stands on the hill above Deep Run is rich in history. The first mention of Deep Run is recorded in "The History of Henrico Parish."

   At a vestry held for Henrico Parish on October 2, 1742, it was agreed and ordered that a chapel be built on the hill above Deep Run. It was to be 48 feet long and 24 feet wide.

   At this same meeting 10,000 pounds of tobacco was appropriated toward the building of this chapel. To some it may seem strange that the side of our church faces the road rather than the front. However, this may be explained by the fact that it was the practice of the early Episcopal Church to position its building east and west.

   Builders tell us the beams in the sanctuary are held together with wooden pegs,. From this and the condition of the timbers, they speculate without doubt that it represents the original framework.

   The Baptist Church, of which Deep Run is a continuous organization, was first known as Hungary or "Hungry" as it was usually called. It was organized out of Chickahominy Baptist Church in 1791. Its name appears in the Dover Association minutes for the first time in 1792 and has an unbroken record up to the present time. The only time the Dover Association met at Deep Run was in 1871.

   In 1920, the first addition was added to the back of the sanctuary. Six classrooms were added at this time. Also in 1920, an extension was made to the sanctuary and a large vestibule was included.

   In the early 1930’s, kerosene lamps were replaced by a Delco Plant to generate electricity. The church was still being heated by a stove in the center of the church. One Sunday during the service, someone noticed the church was on fire. The congregation left the building until the fire was extinguished. With no commotion, the pastor called the people back in, took up his sermon where he left off and completed the service!

   In 1937, the floor in the church was very old. The cracks between the boards and the holes cut to accommodate the tobacco chewers made the floor very cold. When it was proposed that a new floor be placed over the old one, a great argument arose. Some of the older members thought is was not right to cover up the boards that had been trodden on by their forefathers. Finally the church voted to put down a new floor. The completed job cost $175.00.

   Ground breaking exercises for an educational unit were held on November 9, 1952 and completed in 1953.

   In February 1957, the porch that had been a part of the church, perhaps since it was built, was enclosed to make a vestibule.

   In 1958 the Youngmen’s Bible Class took as a project the building of an Education and Fellowship Building. It was completed in 1959.

   In 1963 ground breaking for a parsonage was held. Following the long range plan, ground was broken on March 1, 1969 for the Children’s Building to provide room for those ages nursery through 12 years. The final payment for this building was made in April 1981.

   A Kindergarten and Nursery school was begun in September 1971. In 1977 the sanctuary was air conditioned. City water and sewerage was obtained in 1978.

   In 1984 a project was completed to install cushions in the church pews and carpet.

   In 1989 air conditioning was installed in Fellowship Hall.

   Through the years many students from the University of Richmond served as pastors for Deep Run. Also there have been many capable and dedicated pastors to serve our church.

   We are privileged to have as our pastor at this time the Reverend Dr. Ernest J. Boyd.

  "The torch we carry today –
dedication to the worship of God and the proclamation of His gospel –
has endured in this church for over two hundred years.
It is our obligation and privilege to pass it on
to future generations."


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